Active Studies

Brain activity likely to be involved in control of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) will be recorded by electroencephalography (EEG), a non-invasive technique. These recordings will be used to control a computer-based augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device. The long-term goal is the advancement of BCI technology to provide access to AAC devices via brain activity alone, allowing individuals with severe neuromotor disorders to better engage in social interactions.

The proposed single arm 6 mo. trial will assess the impact of weight loss and fat loss due to a multicomponent remotely-delivered lifestyle intervention on ovulation rates and time-to-ovulation in overweight and obese women with anovulatory infertility caused by PCOS.

The objective of this study is to determine the optimal training intensity and the minimum training duration needed to maximize immediate improvements in walking capacity in chronic stroke. A single-blind, phase II, 3-site randomized controlled trial has been planned. Fifty persons >6 months post stroke will randomize to either moderate-intensity aerobic locomotor training or high-intensity interval locomotor training; each for 45 minutes, 3x/week for up to 36 total sessions over approximately 12 weeks. Clinical measures of walking function, aerobic fitness, daily walking activity and quality of life will be assessed at baseline (PRE) and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of training (POST-4WK, POST-8WK, POST-12WK).

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a lifelong disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. Currently there is no cure for MS.

To help doctors determine how severely MS impacts their patients, we use tests to measure walking, vision, hand use and thinking ability. However, we know that the normal age-related changes that we all can experience as we get older also can make those abilities more difficult for anyone.

This study looks at how the normal age-related changes affect people with and without MS, and will help us in the diagnosis and treatment of MS.

Texting to Promote Mobility in Overweight/Obese Adults with Peripheral Arterial Disease. This study is being conducted at the University of Kansas School of Medicine in Wichita, KS.

Pages